Eating Oysters

THE LOBSTER AND OYSTER RESTAURANT - A LEADING RESTAURANT FOR EATING OYSTERS

EATING OYSTERS IS HEALTHY

Oysters are bursting with minerals such as zinc, iron and calcium. They also provide vitamins A and B12. Their reputation as an aphrodisiac is not just an old wives’ tale: An American and Italian study in 2005 found that they contain a combination of amino acids which increase levels of sex hormones. Perhaps Casanova, who reportedly ate 50 oysters for breakfast, was on to something. To benefit from these amino acids, the oysters must be eaten very fresh and raw – exactly how we love to serve them at our Oyster Restaurant.

It is also worth remembering that 95% of the world’s oysters are sustainably farmed. They are normally harvested by hand – not by dredging which damages local ecosystems. They actually purify the water around them. For these reasons, farmed oysters were given the highest rating on the authoritative Seafood Watch list. So a visit to our Oyster Restaurant should be entirely guilt-free.

OYSTERS THEN AND NOW

Ancient piles of oyster shells show that oysters have been important as food since prehistoric times. The ancient Romans were clearly very fond of oysters, particularly, it seems, oysters from Cancale in France. Sergius Orata, the noted ancient Roman hydraulics expert, was said to be so skilled at oyster cultivation that he could grow them on the roof of his house.

Oysters have not always been a luxury item. In the early 19th century in both Europe and coastal America they were cheap and mainly eaten by the working classes. Eventually, however, rising demand for oysters exhausted many large beds, leading to increased prices. France is still Europe’s largest oyster producer. At our oyster restaurant, oysters, largely from France’s finest sources, are generally served the classic French way – raw, in the shell, with lemon juice and mignonette, a vinaigrette with shallots and cracked white pepper.